Physics of Fluids

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Table of Contents for Physics of Fluids. List of articles from both the latest and ahead of print issues.
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Translational and rotational motion of disk-shaped Marangoni surfers

Tue, 10/01/2019 - 03:12
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 10, October 2019.
In this paper, we study the Marangoni propulsion of a neutrally buoyant disk-shaped object at the air-water interface. Self-propulsion was achieved by coating the back of the disk with either soap or isopropyl alcohol in order to generate and then maintain a surface tension gradient across the surfer. As the propulsion strength and the resulting disk velocity were increased, a transition from a straight-line translational motion to a rotational motion was observed. Although spinning had been observed before for asymmetric objects, these are the first observations of spinning of a geometrically axisymmetric Marangoni surfer. Particle tracking and particle image velocimetry measurements were used to interrogate the resulting flow field and understand the origin of the rotational motion of the disk. These measurements showed that as the Reynolds number was increased, interfacial vortices attached to sides of the disk were formed and intensified. Beyond a critical Reynolds number of Re > 120, a vortex was observed to shed resulting in an unbalanced torque on the disk that caused it to rotate. The interaction between the disk and the confining wall of the Petri dish was also studied. Upon approaching the bounding wall, a transition from straight-line motion to rotational motion was observed at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than on an unconfined interface. Interfacial curvature was found to either enhance or eliminate rotational motion depending on whether the curvature was repulsive (concave) or attractive (convex).

Statistical analysis of temperature distribution on vortex surfaces in hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

Tue, 10/01/2019 - 03:12
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 10, October 2019.
The nonuniform temperature distribution (NUTD) on the coherent vortex surfaces of hypersonic turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is studied using the conditional sampling technique. The direct numerical simulation data of Mach 8 flat-plate TBL flows with different wall temperatures, Tw/T∞ = 10.03 and 1.9, are used for this research, and the coherent vortex surface is identified by the Ω-criterion. Two characteristic sides of the vortex are defined, which are represented by the positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations (±u′) of the vortex surfaces. The conditional sampling results between the mean temperature of the two sides show that there is a significant difference of up to 20% at the same wall-normal location. Furthermore, the velocity-temperature fluctuation correlations (Ru′T′ and Rv′T′) at the characteristic sides of vortex surfaces are studied. It is found that the temperature fluctuations are redistributed by the vortex rotational motion that has taken effect through Ru′T′ and Rv′T′ and then lead to the NUTD. The NUTD features are changed quantitatively by wall cooling but share the similar mechanism as that of the higher-temperature case.

Meltblown technology for production of polymeric microfibers/nanofibers: A review

Fri, 09/27/2019 - 13:56
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
This work summarizes the current state of knowledge in the area of meltblown technology for production of polymeric nonwovens with specific attention to utilized polymers, die design, production of nanofibers, the effect of process variables (such as the throughput rate, melt rheology, melt temperature, die temperature, air temperature/velocity/pressure, die-to-collector distance, and speed) with relation to nonwoven characteristics as well as to typical flow instabilities such as whipping, die drool, fiber breakup, melt spraying, flies, generation of small isolated spherical particles, shots, jam, and generation of nonuniform fiber diameters.

Turbulent drag reduction in Taylor-Couette flows using different super-hydrophobic surface configurations

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 03:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Turbulent drag reduction (DR) in an incompressible Taylor-Couette flow configuration using different patterns of “idealized” superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) on rotating inner-wall is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS). Three dimensional DNS studies based on the finite difference method in cylindrical annuli of aspect ratio (Γ) = 6.0 and radius ratios (η) = 0.5 and 0.67 have been performed at Reynolds numbers (Re) 4000 and 5000. The SHS comprised of streamwise or azimuthal microgrooves (MG), spanwise or longitudinal MG, grooves inclined to the streamwise direction (spiral), and microposts. The SHS have been modeled as shearfree areas. We were able to achieve a maximum DR up to 34% for the streamwise aligned SHS, while we got drag enhancement of 4% for the spiral SHS at η = 0.67. The SHS cause slip at the wall as well as near-wall turbulence modification, both governing the DR. We have tried to understand the role of the effective slip and modified turbulence dynamics responsible for DR by analyzing the statistics of mean flow, velocity fluctuations, Reynolds stresses, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and near-wall streaks. Most of the results show enhanced production of near-wall streamwise velocity fluctuations and TKE resulting in near-wall turbulence enhancement, yet we observed DR for most of the cases, thereby implying slip to be the dominant contributor to DR in comparison to modified near-wall turbulence.

Nonlinear interaction and coalescence features of oscillating bubble pairs: Experimental and numerical study

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 02:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Nonlinear interaction and coalescence features of oscillating bubble pairs are investigated experimentally and numerically. The spark technique is used to generate in-phase bubble pairs with similar size and the simulation is performed with the compressible volume of fluid (VOF) solver in OpenFOAM. The initial conditions for the simulation are determined from the reference case, where the interbubble distance is sufficiently large and the spherical shape is maintained at the moment of maximum volume. Although the microscopic details of the coalescing behaviors are not focused, the compressible VOF solver reproduces the important features of the experiment and shows good grid convergence. We systematically investigate the effects of the dimensionless interbubble distance γ (scaled by the maximum bubble radius) and define three different coalescing patterns, namely, coalescence due to the expansion in the first cycle for γ < 1.1 (Pattern I), bubble breaking up and collapsing together with coalescence at the initial rebounding stage for 1.1 < γ < 2.0 (Pattern II), and coalescence of the rebounding toroidal bubbles for 2.0 < γ < 3.65 (Pattern III). For Pattern I, prominent gas flow and velocity fluctuation can be observed in the coalescing region, which may induce the annular protrusion in the middle of the coalesced bubble. For Patterns II and III, migration of the bubbles toward each other during the collapsing and rebounding stages greatly facilitates the bubble coalescence.

High-speed film-thickness measurements between a collapsing cavitation bubble and a solid surface with total internal reflection shadowmetry

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 02:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
The time evolution of the liquid-film thickness of a single cavitation bubble in water collapsing onto a solid surface is measured. To this end, total internal reflection (TIR) shadowmetry is developed, a technique based on TIR and the imaging of shadows of an optical structure on a polished glass surface. The measurements are performed at frame rates up to 480 kHz. Simultaneous high-speed imaging of the bubble shape at up to 89 kHz allows relating the evolution of the film thickness to the bubble dynamics. With a typical maximum bubble radius of 410 µm, we varied the nondimensional stand-off distance γ from 0.47 to 1.07. We find that during the first collapse phase, the bubble does not come in direct contact with the solid surface. Instead, when the bubble collapses, the jet impacts on a liquid film that always resides between the bubble and solid. At jet impact, it is 5–40 µm thick, depending on γ. Also, during rebound, at any given point in time, most or all of the then overall toroidal bubble is not in contact with the solid surface.

Mechanisms for turbulent separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number of 1.6 × 106

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 02:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
We have conducted large-eddy simulations of turbulent separated flows over a NACA0015 airfoil with control by a plasma actuator. The Reynolds number based on the chord length is 1 600 000, and the angle of attack is 20.1°. At this angle of attack, the flow around the airfoil is fully separated. The effects of the location and operating conditions of the plasma actuator on the separation control are investigated. The plasma actuator is set at the leading edge, the turbulent reattachment point, or near the turbulent separation point. The nondimensional burst frequency (F+) is set to 1, 4, or 100. These frequencies are determined based on the dominant frequencies of the turbulent separated flow field of the no control case. A continuous actuation case has also been conducted. The location of the actuator where it most effectively suppresses the separation is the one closest to the turbulent separation point. In the burst mode case, the nondimensional burst frequency of unity is most effective in terms of the increase in the lift. To clarify the effective control mechanism, five objectives for turbulent separation control are compared. The results show that it is difficult to suppress the turbulent separation using the same strategies as in laminar separation control. The effective mechanism for turbulent separation control by burst actuation is found to be inducing the pairing of large-scale vortices near the airfoil surface. This large-scale vortex pairing induces freestream momentum into the boundary layer, leading to separation suppression. In addition, three other control effects can be achieved by varying the operating settings of the plasma actuator. The drag is slightly improved by reducing the length of the laminar separation bubble through high-frequency actuation from the leading edge.

Evaporation-induced flow around a droplet in different gases

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 02:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
It is known from recent studies that evaporation induces flow around a droplet at atmospheric conditions. This flow is visible even for slowly evaporating liquids like water. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the ambient gas on the evaporating droplet. We observe from the experiments that the rate of evaporation at atmospheric temperature and pressure decreases in a heavier ambient gas. The evaporation-induced flow in these gases for different liquids is measured using particle image velocimetry and found to be very different from each other. However, the width of the disturbed zone around the droplet is seen to be independent of the evaporating liquid and the size of the needle (for the range of needle diameters studied), and only depends on the ambient gas used.

Accelerating deep reinforcement learning strategies of flow control through a multi-environment approach

Thu, 09/26/2019 - 02:34
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL) has recently been proposed as a methodology to discover complex active flow control strategies [Rabault et al., “Artificial neural networks trained through deep reinforcement learning discover control strategies for active flow control,” J. Fluid Mech. 865, 281–302 (2019)]. However, while promising results were obtained on a simple 2-dimensional benchmark flow at a moderate Reynolds number, considerable speedups will be required to investigate more challenging flow configurations. In the case of DRL trained with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data, it was found that the CFD part, rather than training the artificial neural network, was the limiting factor for speed of execution. Therefore, speedups should be obtained through a combination of two approaches. The first one, which is well documented in the literature, is to parallelize the numerical simulation itself. The second one is to adapt the DRL algorithm for parallelization. Here, a simple strategy is to use several independent simulations running in parallel to collect experiences faster. In the present work, we discuss this solution for parallelization. We illustrate that perfect speedups can be obtained up to the batch size of the DRL agent, and slightly suboptimal scaling still takes place for an even larger number of simulations. This is, therefore, an important step toward enabling the study of more sophisticated fluid mechanics problems through DRL.

Thermodynamic effects on Venturi cavitation characteristics

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 02:28
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
In this paper, the thermodynamic effect is systematically studied by Venturi cavitation in a blow-down type tunnel for the first time, using water at temperatures up to relatively high levels and at controlled dissolved gas contents in the supply reservoir (measured by dissolved oxygen, DO). The mean attached cavity length [math] is chosen to reveal the thermodynamic effect, and the cavitation characteristics are analyzed from the experiments. With an increase in the thermodynamic parameter Σ*, a decrease in [math] vs the pressure recovery number κ is observed, which is consistent with suppression of cavitation by the thermodynamic effect, but the decrease is related not only to this effect. Based on the experimental results, a model is presented of the attached cavity cloud that develops from the Venturi throat. It is found that either the length of this cloud oscillates stably around a mean value or the cloud breaks regularly at some upstream position, allowing that a detached cavity cloud is shed, flows downstream, and collapses while the remaining attached cloud regenerates. Applying this model to experimental results obtained first with cold water, then with hot water, we find that when the mean length of the attached cavity cloud oscillates stably, temperature increase causes reduction of the mean cavitation length. This is interpreted to be a consequence of the thermodynamic effect. When detachment of large cavity clouds occurs, the mean length is increased at temperature increase. This is a consequence of cloud configuration changes being superposed on changes due to the thermodynamic effect. These observations explain conflicting results reported for attached cavity clouds in relation to the thermodynamic effect. The gas content in the water is found to be without significance within the range of DO tested.

Turbulent transport and mixing in the multimode narrowband Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 02:28
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
The mean momentum and heavy mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, and heavy mass fraction variance fields, as well as the budgets of their transport equations are examined several times during the evolution of a narrowband Richtmyer-Meshkov instability initiated by a Mach 1.84 shock traversing a perturbed interface separating gases with a density ratio of 3. The results are computed using the “quarter scale” data from four algorithms presented in the θ-group study of Thornber et al. [“Late-time growth rate, mixing, and anisotropy in the multimode narrowband Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: The θ-group collaboration,” Phys. Fluids 29, 105107 (2017)]. The present study is inspired by a previous similar study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and mixing using direct numerical simulation data by Schilling and Mueschke [“Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data,” Phys. Fluids 22, 105102 (2010)]. In addition to comparing the predictions of the data from four implicit large-eddy simulation codes, the budgets are used to quantify the relative importance of the terms in the transport equations, and the balance of the terms is employed to infer the numerical dissipation. Terms arising from the compressibility of the flow are examined, in particular the pressure-dilatation. The results are useful for validation of large-eddy simulation and Reynolds-averaged modeling of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

Determination of the volume fraction in (water-gasoil-air) multiphase flows using a simple and low-cost technique: Artificial neural networks

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 02:03
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
The precise prediction of the volume fraction in three-phase flows plays an important role in the petroleum and process industries. In this study, attenuation gamma rays (single pencil beam) and multilayer perceptron neural networks were used to precisely predict the volume fraction percentage in water-gasoil-air three-phase flows. The detection system uses just one 137Cs source (single energy of 662 keV) and one NaI(Tl) detector in order to calculate the transmitted beams. The experimental setup was simulated using the MCNPX code to provide the required data for the neural network. The volume fraction percentage was measured with a root mean square error of 2.48 and a mean relative error percentage of less than 7.08%. The proposed setup is the best and simplest design for reducing radiation hazards and cost.

The effect of deformability on the microscale flow behavior of red blood cell suspensions

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 02:03
Physics of Fluids, Volume MNFC2019, Issue 1, October 2019.
Red blood cell (RBC) deformability is important for tissue perfusion and a key determinant of blood rheology. Diseases such as diabetes, sickle cell anemia, and malaria, as well as prolonged storage, may affect the mechanical properties of RBCs altering their hemodynamic behavior and leading to microvascular complications. However, the exact role of RBC deformability on microscale blood flow is not fully understood. In the present study, we extend our previous work on healthy RBC flows in bifurcating microchannels [Sherwood et al., “Viscosity and velocity distributions of aggregating and non-aggregating blood in a bifurcating microchannel,” Biomech. Model. Mechanobiol. 13, 259–273 (2014); Sherwood et al., “Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local hemodynamics,” PLoS One 9, e100473 (2014); and Kaliviotis et al., “Local viscosity distribution in bifurcating microfluidic blood flows,” Phys. Fluids 30, 030706 (2018)] to quantify the effects of impaired RBC deformability on the velocity and hematocrit distributions in microscale blood flows. Suspensions of healthy and glutaraldehyde hardened RBCs perfused through straight microchannels at various hematocrits and flow rates were imaged, and velocity and hematocrit distributions were determined simultaneously using micro-Particle Image Velocimetry and light transmission methods, respectively. At low feed hematocrits, hardened RBCs were more dispersed compared to healthy ones, consistent with decreased migration of stiffer cells. At high hematocrit, the loss of deformability was found to decrease the bluntness of velocity profiles, implying a reduction in shear thinning behavior. The hematocrit bluntness also decreased with hardening of the cells, implying an inversion of the correlation between velocity and hematocrit bluntness with loss of deformability. The study illustrates the complex interplay of various mechanisms affecting confined RBC suspension flows and the impact of both deformability and feed hematocrit on the resulting microstructure.

The effect of deformability on the microscale flow behavior of red blood cell suspensions

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 02:03
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Red blood cell (RBC) deformability is important for tissue perfusion and a key determinant of blood rheology. Diseases such as diabetes, sickle cell anemia, and malaria, as well as prolonged storage, may affect the mechanical properties of RBCs altering their hemodynamic behavior and leading to microvascular complications. However, the exact role of RBC deformability on microscale blood flow is not fully understood. In the present study, we extend our previous work on healthy RBC flows in bifurcating microchannels [Sherwood et al., “Viscosity and velocity distributions of aggregating and non-aggregating blood in a bifurcating microchannel,” Biomech. Model. Mechanobiol. 13, 259–273 (2014); Sherwood et al., “Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local hemodynamics,” PLoS One 9, e100473 (2014); and Kaliviotis et al., “Local viscosity distribution in bifurcating microfluidic blood flows,” Phys. Fluids 30, 030706 (2018)] to quantify the effects of impaired RBC deformability on the velocity and hematocrit distributions in microscale blood flows. Suspensions of healthy and glutaraldehyde hardened RBCs perfused through straight microchannels at various hematocrits and flow rates were imaged, and velocity and hematocrit distributions were determined simultaneously using micro-Particle Image Velocimetry and light transmission methods, respectively. At low feed hematocrits, hardened RBCs were more dispersed compared to healthy ones, consistent with decreased migration of stiffer cells. At high hematocrit, the loss of deformability was found to decrease the bluntness of velocity profiles, implying a reduction in shear thinning behavior. The hematocrit bluntness also decreased with hardening of the cells, implying an inversion of the correlation between velocity and hematocrit bluntness with loss of deformability. The study illustrates the complex interplay of various mechanisms affecting confined RBC suspension flows and the impact of both deformability and feed hematocrit on the resulting microstructure.

Manipulation of jet breakup length and droplet size in axisymmetric flow focusing upon actuation

Tue, 09/24/2019 - 13:31
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
External sinusoidal actuation is employed in the axisymmetric flow focusing (AFF) for generating uniform droplets in the jetting mode. The perturbations propagating along the meniscus surface can modulate the rupture of the liquid jet. Experiments indicate that the jet breakup length and the resultant droplet size can be precisely controlled in the synchronized regime, which are further confirmed by the scaling law. The finding of this study can help for better understanding of the underlying physics of actuation-aided AFF, and this active droplet generation method with fine robustness, high productivity, and nice process control would be advantageous for various potential applications.

Simulation of blood flow past a distal arteriovenous-graft anastomosis at low Reynolds numbers

Tue, 09/24/2019 - 03:53
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Patients with end-stage renal disease are usually treated by hemodialysis while waiting for a kidney transplant. A common device for vascular access is an arteriovenous graft (AVG). However, AVG failure induced by thrombosis has been plaguing dialysis practice for decades. Current studies indicate that the thrombosis is caused by intimal hyperplasia, which is triggered by the abnormal flows and forces [e.g., wall shear stress (WSS)] in the vein after AVG implant. Due to the high level of complexity, in almost all of the existing works of modeling and simulation of the blood-flow vessel-AVG system, the graft and blood vessel are assumed to be rigid and immobile. Very recently, we have found that the compliance of graft and vein can reduce flow disturbances and lower WSS [Z. Bai and L. Zhu, “Three-dimensional simulation of a viscous flow past a compliant model of arteriovenous-graft anastomosis,” Comput. Fluids 181, 403–415 (2019)]. In this paper, we apply the compliant model to investigate possible effects of several dimensionless parameters (AVG graft-vein diameter ratio [math], AVG attaching angle θ, flow Reynolds numbers Re, and native vein speed [math]) on the flow and force fields near the distal AVG anastomosis at low Reynolds numbers (up to several hundreds). Our computational results indicate that the influences of the parameters [math], θ, and Re lie largely on the graft and the influence of [math] lies largely on the vein. In any case, the WSS, wall shear stress gradient, and wall normal stress gradient and their averaged values on the graft are significantly greater than those on the vein.

Comparison of the quasi-steady-state heat transport in phase-change and classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection for a wide range of Stefan number and Rayleigh number

Tue, 09/24/2019 - 03:42
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
We report the first comparative study of the phase-change Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) convection system and the classical RB convection system to systematically characterize the effect of the oscillating solid-liquid interface on the RB convection. Here, the role of Stefan number Ste (defined as the ratio between the sensible heat to the latent heat) and the Rayleigh number based on the averaged liquid height Raf is systematically explored with direct numerical simulations for low Prandtl number fluid (Pr = 0.0216) in a phase-change RB convection system during the stationary state. The control parameters Raf (3.96 × 104 ≤ Raf ≤ 9.26 × 107) and Ste (1.1 × 10−2 ≤ Ste ≤ 1.1 × 102) are varied over a wide range to understand its influence on the heat transport and flow features. Here, we report the comparison of large-scale motions and temperature fields, frequency power spectra for vertical velocity, and a scaling law for the time-averaged Nusselt number at the hot plate [math] vs Raf for both the RB systems. The intensity of solid-liquid interface oscillations and the standard deviation of Nuh increase with the increase in Ste and Raf. There are two distinct RB flow configurations at low Raf independent of Ste. At low and moderate Raf, the ratio of the Nusselt number for phase-change RB convection to the Nusselt number for classical RB convection [math] is always greater than one. However, at higher Raf, the RB convection is turbulent, and [math] can be less than or greater than one depending on the value of Ste. The results may turn out to be of immense consequence for understanding and altering the transport characteristics in the phase-change RB convection systems.

Directionally controlled open channel microfluidics

Mon, 09/23/2019 - 03:38
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
Free-surface microscale flows have been attracting increasing attention from the research community in recent times, as attributable to their diverse fields of applications ranging from fluid mixing and particle manipulation to biochemical processing on a chip. Traditionally, electrically driven processes governing free surface microfluidics are mostly effective in manipulating fluids having characteristically low values of the electrical conductivity (lower than 0.085 S/m). Biological and biochemical processes, on the other hand, typically aim to manipulate fluids having higher electrical conductivities (>0.1 S/m). To circumvent the inherent limitation of traditional electrokinetic processes in manipulating highly conductive fluids in free surface flows, here we experimentally develop a novel on-chip methodology for the same by exploiting the interaction between an alternating electric current and an induced thermal field. We show that the consequent local gradients in physical properties as well as interfacial tension can be tuned to direct the flow toward a specific location on the interface. The present experimental design opens up a new realm of on-chip process control without necessitating the creation of a geometric confinement. We envisage that this will also open up research avenues on open-channel microfluidics, an area that has vastly remained unexplored.

On gravity currents of fixed volume that encounter a down-slope or up-slope bottom

Mon, 09/23/2019 - 03:38
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
We consider a gravity current released from a lock into an ambient fluid of smaller density, that, from the beginning or after some horizontal propagation X1, propagates along an inclined (up- or down-) bottom. The flow (assumed in the inertial-buoyancy regime) is modeled by the shallow-water (SW) equations with a jump condition applied at the nose (front). The behavior of the current is dominated by the slope angle, θ, but is also affected by additional dimensionless parameters: the aspect ratio of the lock x0/h0, the height ratio of the ambient to lock, H/h0, and the distance of the backwall from the beginning of the slope, X1/x0. We show that the stability of the interface, reflected by the value of the bulk Richardson number, Ri, is essential in the interpretation and modeling. In the upslope flow, Ri increases and hence entrainment/mixing effects are unimportant. In the downslope flow, the current first accelerates and Ri decreases; this enhances entrainment and drag, which then decelerate the current. We show that the accelerating-decelerating downstream current is reproduced well by a SW model combined with a simple closure for the entrainment and drag. A comparison of the theoretical results with previously published experimental data for both upslope flow and downslope flow show fair agreement.

Cahn-Hilliard mobility of fluid-fluid interfaces from molecular dynamics

Mon, 09/23/2019 - 03:37
Physics of Fluids, Volume 31, Issue 9, September 2019.
The Cahn-Hilliard equation is often used to model the temporospatial evolution of multiphase fluid systems including droplets, bubbles, aerosols, and liquid films. This equation requires knowledge of the fluid-fluid interfacial mobility γ, a parameter that can be difficult to obtain experimentally. In this work, a method to obtain γ from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is presented. γ is obtained for liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor interfaces by perturbing them from their equilibrium phase fraction spatial distributions, using molecular dynamics simulations to observe their relaxation toward equilibrium, and fitting the Cahn-Hilliard model to the transient molecular simulations at each time step. γ is then compared to a different measure of interfacial mobility, the molecular interfacial mobility M. It is found that γ is proportional to the product of M, the interface thickness, and the ratio of thermal energy to interfacial energy.

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